Category: career change

For the Love of Micro-Goals

As some of you may have learned, I, uh, don’t usually make rapid, astonishing progress towards any of my goals. That reality really, in the words of the incomparable Phyllis Neffler from Troop Beverly Hills, frosts my cookies. I so wish I was the sort of person who could see dramatic, super-fast progress in, like, pretty much any area of life — and knowing that I usually have to keep slogging away at stuff is super annoying. Maybe it’s because I’m just an Xennial whose brain was molded by the internet and instant gratification, but hey, we can’t all be perfect.

Instead, my progress tends to be slow but usually steady — and thank god, because if it weren’t for that part I’d lose my mind — and it tends to require a lot of work on my part to stay motivated, productive, and on task.

Like, a lot of work.

Like, an obnoxious amount of work.

Like, I should probably feel mortified and personally victimized by how much work it requires.

But the fact is, my slow progress is still progress. And even if I do things like 1) break a task into wee little tasks like “open the folder” or “put the receipts in the envelope,” and 2) write down tasks I’ve already done just so I can have a sense of accomplishment when I cross them off, it’s still productive. And at least my ability to be a functional adult hasn’t deteriorated to the point of being featured on an episode of Hoarders, right? (Please tell me I’m right.)

Anyways, all that being said, I felt super vindicated today when I read The New York Times’ Smarter Living column on how micro-tasks can help people gain productivity momentum when they’re struggling to get started with (or to finish) a task. Guys, my love of putting already-accomplished mini-tasks on my list has a basis in actual science!

Enter micro-progress.

Pardon the gimmicky phrase, but the idea goes like this: For any task you have to complete, break it down into the smallest possible units of progress and attack them one at a time. … What’s so striking about applying this law of motion to productivity is that once you shift your thinking into this frame — I’ve started being productive, sI’m going to keep being productive — you achieve those micro-goals at what feels like an exponentially increasing rate without even realizing it.

YOU GUYYYYYS. This actually kind of works, both in day-to-day and big-picture, grand strategy contexts: on a day to day basis, my goals tend to be pretty small, but each small step helps me move forward. It may be at the pace of a geriatric snail in a lake of molasses, but whatever. It’s still progress.

So, with that in mind, here are the mini- and not-so-mini steps that I took, and things that made me stop and really think over the course of the last week:

  • I’m applied for a job that asks candidates to have “a defensible position on the Oxford comma,” and I basically started fangirling as soon as I read it. I haven’t put in a formal job application anywhere outside of the federal government for almost ten years, so this was a big deal for me. I don’t know if I’ll even hear from them, but I was at least excited and encouraged to find that there are, in fact, jobs that I can get excited about. UNICORNS ARE REAL, Y’ALL.

Fangirling

  • I tried a couple of new and awesome face masks, courtesy of a dear friend who sent me an incredible care package. I have this burgeoning love of skincare, which comes at an inconvenient time since I’m unemployed — all the more reason to still be giddy about said care package — and I was super excited to try them out. The kaolin clay mask made me look like the Babadook when I had it on, but it detoxed the bejesus out of my skin and was therefore 100% worth it.
  • I also spent a lot of time adulting this week: reviewing my finances, organizing and filing the papers that I haphazardly threw into a bin when I was rushing to get packed and moved out of D.C., etc. It was the total absolute opposite of glamorous, and I required a ton of popcorn to sustain me through these trials, but I was super relieved to get it all done.
  • I installed two new apps on my phone — that’s not a big deal, since I tend to get a bit app-happy (Me: Ooooh, that looks cool and possibly useful! Also me: But do you need it? Also, also me: Screw it, this will be useful somehow!) — that are helping me stay accountable to myself. (And, apparently, to my phone. Because apparently I care about whether or not its judging me.)
    • The first, Momentum, is a habit tracker that helps me keep track of all sorts of good stuff: you can customize the list, so mine includes flossing (my least favorite hygiene task in the history of my existence), drinking enough water, meditating, journaling, creativity, and reading. These are all things I want to do more of, but I tend to put them off until everything else is done, at which point…I zone out on my phone. (*Womp womp wommmmmmmp*)
    • That brings me to the second app, Moment, which runs in the background and tracks the number of times I pick up my phone in a day, the amount of screen time I put in, and which apps I use the most. Fun fact: I spend entirely too much time with my face in my phone, and most of it is spent on Facebook (AKA: The Official Social Media Platform of Old People). I figure that Moment can keep me apprised of how ridiculous my screen time has become at any given point, and that Momentum can help me reincorporate the other things I love to do, like reading, journaling, and art.
  • I’m doing a lot more running and biking these days, too — and good lord do I need it. I mean, yes, we all know about the physical benefits of exercise and blah blah blah, but you guys, it’s increasingly clear that my mental health depends on this. On days when I don’t exercise, I’m stabby and agitated. I have a short temper. I don’t like pretty much anything.lord is testing meBut once those endorphins hit my brain, it’s like a whole new ballgame. I don’t hate everything! It doesn’t all feel like a cosmic joke! Granted, my face is usually so red that people wonder I’m going to keel over and die at any moment, but that’s not the point. Endorphins are the point, and they’re my homies for life. #selfcare, y’all.

I’ve also noticed that since leaving my job last fall, my chronic pain and fatigue issues have gotten dramatically better. I still get a little achy from time to time, but it’s nowhere near as bad as it was a year ago. I never noticed until recently how much better I feel, and I suspect that this, too, was a case of micro-progress: the improvements were so incremental that I didn’t notice them until they really started adding up.

Fingers are crossed that my other life-improving efforts follow a similar trajectory, amirite?

Big News

So…I’ve got big news (ya know, as evidenced by the title): I quit my job.

This is something I’ve been wanting to do for a long time — I’ve been unhappy in my career for aaaaages — but given all the health shenanigans of the last few years, it just wasn’t possible. Once things stabilized, Brandon (the hubs) and I started laying the groundwork: I started a side gig doing freelance writing, and we began setting aside extra savings.

I originally planned to hold on until the end of the calendar year, if not a bit longer, just to get some extra savings built up before noping out of there — but then my mental health just kind of…tanked.

You know how a person can be running a marathon/other super long distance race that I can’t even begin to fathom, and sometimes their body just quits? Everything shuts down, and they can’t take another step. It’s a total system collapse: no matter how badly they want to keep going and how hard they’re trying, it’s simply not going to happen. They’ve hit a biological wall.

For me it was like that, but with my mental health. I’ve been pushing myself for so long, and suddenly I was unequivocally, irrevocably done. I felt it down to my bones — on a visceral, cellular level — that neither my psyche nor my soul could continue without a clearly defined end in sight. There they were, splayed out on the pavement and trying to crawl towards a finish line that didn’t yet exist. Recognizing that this was a precipitous decline in my mental health, the truth became clear: I had to create a finish line, and I had to do it now.

To keep grinding, pushing, and just generally pulverizing myself would be enormously harmful, and I can’t let that happen. I’ve already been through, and lost, entirely too much to let myself fall victim to harm that I have the power to prevent. It’s one thing to be trapped, but it’s an entirely different beast to remain imprisoned when the one thing standing between me and freedom is courage.

I’ve always felt like courage and bravery are my greatest weaknesses — I’m anxious, risk averse, and being brave doesn’t come easily to me at all — and I know now is the time for me to take the leap of faith that I’ve been aching for for such a long time. Leaps of faith aren’t usually my thing (I like lists, and lists about my lists, and plans, and risk mitigation strategies, and at least attempting to have my shit together), but it’s time.

I’m going to stay until the end of October, just so I have time to wrap up my projects, jump through the flaming hoops of bureaucratic out-processing, and generally try not to leave a huge mess in my wake.

But after that? I leap.

 

Our actions and decisions today will shap
This is what I keep trying to remind myself, at least. If it’s a quote on the internet it has to be true, right?! 
Mama* Needs a New Job, Like, Yesterday.

Mama* Needs a New Job, Like, Yesterday.

One of my big goals — nay, one of my primary goals — in renovating my life is to somehow, by the grace of God/Oprah/the Flying Spaghetti Monster, transition from my career in government to a career that’s more my style.

I may or may not be willing to sacrifice a goat and/or make a burnt offering in an effort to help make this happen.

I’ve been trying to investigate possible avenues for this aspiring career change, since a lukewarm, limp, and — ok, I admit — really whiny “I dooooon’t knoooooow?” isn’t a great answer to questions about what, if not government and public policy, I want to do with my life. All I know for sure is that I want my work to involve writing, autonomy, creativity, and being able to serve as a catalyst for good in the world. Beyond that, though? The details elude me.

dafuq
An actual photo of me when people ask what I want to be when I grow up. Except that I have dark hair. And I’m 36. But that’s not the point.

Well, ok, that’s not entirely true. The full truth is that I want to be a writer. I’ve been in love with words since I was a child; I remember desperately  wanting to learn how to read because I knew my whole world would change once I did, and I used to beg my teachers for extra creative writing assignments when I was in grade school. There have only been two things that I’ve consistently always known I want to be when I grow up: a writer and a mom.

Hooooowever, I’m also a realist, and we all know that unless one is an extremely successful novelist like, say, J.K. Rowling (whom I admire and adore), that writing generally doesn’t pay the bills. So, while I’d love to just…be a writer, the reality is that freelance writing isn’t exactly reliable or lucrative. And, since I have enough student loan debt to sink a fleet of aircraft carriers, and since I also enjoy things such as having food and a nice place to live, a gal’s got to make money somehow.

With that in mind, I’m investigating a handful of ideas for jobs that a) I might enjoy, and b) can pretty reliably pay the bills: content marketing, social media marketing, grant writing, college essay tutoring, and copyediting. That list might expand  — or contract — as I learn more, but for now, information gathering is my primary game plan. My hope is that I can build multiple streams of income so that I will, to use finance speak, diversify my portfolio. You know, balance risk and reward, remain agile, all that jazz.

(Although really, I ran far and fast from any sort of math class once I was done with high school, and I never once looked back — so maybe I should give the finance metaphors a rest?)

Anyways, aaaallllll that being said, yesterday’s Act of Renovation was to visit my friendly local career center to review my resume with people who are Legit Authorities (TM) on this sort of career voodoo. Mercifully, these people are incredibly helpful. They’ve been helping me though each painful, bewildering step of editing my resume from a Lumbering, Bland, and Bureaucratic Government Resume, which is loaded with arcane D.C.- and government-centric terms, into a Nimble, Witty, and Modern Private Sector Resume (also TM…but not really, I just like making proper nouns out of things that don’t warrant capitalization in real life). You know, one that can actually be read and understood by normal people outside the Beltway.

The woman I met with not only really liked my first round of changes (yay!), she also had some insightful suggestions for my next iteration revisions (double yay!). So, I have myself an Act of Renovation for later in the week, too.

We on the rise, y’all.

* Oh yeah, and I’m not actually a mom, despite weirdly referring to myself as Mama. That whole cancer thing kind of deep-sixed my grand maternal plans, but that’s a topic for another post.